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ID Showcase – Care Work – Disability Justice and Health Care

Nursing M172 & M172XP – Care Work: Disability Justice and Health Care

NURS172XP course site

This showcase highlights accessibility and engaged learning through the instructor’s experience designing a multidisciplinary two-course package. Community-engaged learning personalized disability care policy and caregiving practice through reflective relationship building. For instance, the course integrated Perusall to center disabled voices, deepen student preparation, and provide flexible engagement. It authorizes students to become creators of accessible information. By creating small groups called bird flocks, the course simulates carewebs that accomplish class activities. In addition, it structures community engagement through reflective relational logs, a field trip to the Momentum partner agency, attendance at the Ability Expo, and movies supported by the library mini-grant program, which creates a highly engaged learning environment for students. 


What to Expect in this Showcase

In this session, the instructor will share her experience designing a multidisciplinary two-course package that showcases accessibility and engaged learning. Course topics of accessibility and carework were mirrored in course design. Community-engaged learning personalized disability care policy and caregiving practice through reflective relationship building. Topics to be covered include:

  • Using Perusall to center disabled voices, deepen student preparation, and provide flexible engagement.
  • Authorizing students to become creators of accessible information.
  • Creating small groups called bird flocks to simulate carewebs that accomplish class activities.
  • Structuring community engagement through reflective relational logs, a field trip to the Momentum partner agency, attendance at the Ability Expo, and movies supported by the library mini-grant program.

Presenter Bios
Lauren Clark is a public health nurse and the Shapiro Family Endowed Chair in Developmental Disability Studies in the School of Nursing. She teaches health professions students to advocate for health equity and quality of life for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She works with the UCLA Tarjan Center and is on the Board of Directors of Disability Rights California.

Yuri Matsuo is a psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner and a PhD student studying Down syndrome, aging, and family care. She is a Teaching Assistant in the Care Work community-engaged learning course.

ID Showcase – ENGCOMP 403

ENGCOMP 403 – Language Pedagogy: Form, Meaning, and Function

What to Expect in this Showcase

This Instructional Design Showcase will explore several online-synchronous course design elements that were developed during the pandemic and have been continually refined in the years after based on student feedback. Through the course demonstration, the instructor explained how the homepage and modules had been setup, discussed several student engagement solutions such as flipped course design, audio-video content packages, and interactive class sessions, and also explored a few effective feedback practices through audio-video feedback packages and extended zoom conferences.The specific items that will be covered are as follows:

  • Course Organization (Homepage Design & Module Setup)
  • Student Engagement (Flipped Course Design, Audio-Video Content Packages, and interactive Class Sessions)
  • Feedback Practice (Audio-Video Feedback Packages and extended Zoom Conferences)

Presenter Bio

Jeremy Kelley serves as the Associate Director of UCLA’s Writing Programs, UCLA’s academic home for both English composition and English as a Second Language. In addition to teaching both undergraduate and graduate language and writing courses, he teaches the language teacher training seminar for graduate student ESL instructors and mentors new graduate instructors through their initial teaching appointment. He also teaches the core language pedagogy seminar for the language-learner emphasis of Writing Programs’ Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy.

ID Showcase – Honors 37W and ChatGPT

A ChatGPT Experiment in Honors 37W

This showcase is an extension of an earlier talk Laurel Westrup gave as part of the Spring 2023 “AI in Action” event. It will focus on a specific use of ChatGPT in a Spring 2023 Honors Collegium Writing II course, “Sampling and Remix: The Aesthetics and Politics of Cultural Appropriation.”

Honors 37W, which focuses on cultural borrowing of many kinds, was an apt forum for discussion of generative artificial intelligence (Gen-AI) and large language models (LLMs) that draw on borrowed sources in order to create text. The instructor re-designed a staple course assignment to provide students an opportunity to try out and reflect on co-writing with a chatbot. The showcase will:

  • Provide context and a rationale for this particular use of ChatGPT
  • Discuss the assignment design
  • Review student responses to the assignment
  • Offer some thoughts on integrating ChatGPT into our courses based on this experiment 

Presenter Bio

Laurel Westrup is a Continuing Lecturer with Writing Programs and the Honors Program and the Coordinator of the Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy (GCWP). She teaches courses across Writing Programs’ curriculum, from first-year composition and Writing II to upper division courses in the Professional Writing Minor, and she also teaches graduate pedagogy courses with the GCWP. She received a UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award in 2023.

ID Showcase – English Composition 2

English Composition 2 – Approaches to University Writing | Meta-Narrative and the Narrative Self

In this course showcase session, Shane Crosby will share his experiences, the pros and cons, of using a variety of Bruin Learn tools to actively engage undergraduate students in the content of a first-year composition course.

This showcase demonstrates how the instructor uses Bruin Learn to actively engage undergraduate students in a first-year composition course. Several essential Bruin Learn tools and features, such as homepage, modules, assignments, and gradebook, are discussed. The exploration of different tool settings throughout the course design process with the support of the Bruin Learn Center of Excellence is shared.

The tools reviewed include:

  • Home Page
    • Attendance, ebook integration, syllabi, course notification settings
    • eBook integration: They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing
  • Modules
    • Organization
    • The “getting started” / Course Resource module
    • Lock Until | prerequisites | requirements
    • New feature: dropdown arrow options
    • Creating all assignments from within the Modules(?)
  • Assignments
    • Creating grading rules
  • Grades / Gradebook Settings
    • When to make it available, pros and cons, likes and dislikes
    • Late submission policy considerations
    • Grade posting considerations
    • Advanced feature settings

Presenter Bio

Shane Crosby is a Continuing Lecturer in Writing Programs at UCLA. He completed his BA at UCLA, MA in Special Education at Clark Atlanta University, PhD in Special Education at Georgia State University, and his MFA degree at UC Irvine.

This ID Showcase is a collaboration between the UCLA Teaching and Learning Center and the Bruin Learn Center of Excellence.

AI Resources for Learning Design

AI Resources for Learning Design

Sample syllabi + syllabus formats and sections

Syllabus Statements on the Use of AI in Courses

AI for Assignment & Learning Design

  • Stanford University. Curricular Resources About AI for Teaching (CRAFT)
  • Trust, T. (2023). Chat GPT & Education, UMass (Amherst); including:
    • What ChatGPT Can Do, pp. 18-39;
    • What Chat GPT Can’t Do (Yet), pp. 40-42.
  • UNESCO. (2023). Chat GPT and AI in Higher Education: Quick Start Guide. See the table on page 9.
  • Watkins, R. Update Your Course Syllabus for ChatGPT – GWU
  • Young J. (2023). Why I’m Excited About ChatGPT: Here are 10 ways ChatGPT will be a boon to first-year writing instruction, Jennie Young writes.
  • Kim DeBacco’s (untested) assignment idea:
    • Ask your students to input into ChatGPT the assignment prompt (eg. compare and contrast 2 films on the same topic).
    • They must then analyze what Chat GPT generates first time round: what it got right, wrong, what’s missing, what’s not emphasized that should have been, and perhaps more, depending on the original prompt and your imagination – or indeed the conceptual demands of the course!
    • Ask the students to submit the initial AI-generated raw version to you, along with their critical analysis of the AI-generated piece in light of the other course-related material (eg. films or readings) you were asking them to compare & contrast, or analyze.

The World of AI Tools

Using ChatGPT for Syllabus Refresh

Syllabus Refresh – Prompt Engineering for ChatGPT

The following are notes from OTL’s session for the AI in Action series.

Kim DeBacco and Kate Schaller worked with faculty to generate and regenerate a course syllabus. Together they investigated prompt engineering to iteratively refine their choices.

Session materials:

Ask Chat GPT to create a syllabus

Initial prompt:

Design a syllabus for an introductory, undergraduate-level university course about "The Psychology of Aging".

Sample refining prompt:

Regenerate this syllabus to include the following syllabus sections:

Course title: “The Psychology of Aging” (PSY136) 
Instructor Information: Kim DeBacco, PhD; kdebacco@online.ucla.edu
TA Information: Qiwen Moore, David Christomakis. 
Contact Information: tba
Course Prerequisites: PSY124
Course Description:
Learning Outcomes for this Course:
Course Materials:
Technical Requirements (Bruin Learn, browsers etc.)
How to Succeed in this Course (Expectations for Students, Study Advice & Tips)
Creating an Inclusive Classroom Community (Instructor, TA, and Community Expectations)
Course Schedule (Dates & Topics, Readings)
Predictable Weekly Pattern (for Students)
How Your Learning Will Be Assessed (Grading Policy)
Information about the Course Assignments
Link to the Quarter dates in the UCLA Academic calendar 
The class dates and times: Tuesday 10am - 12noon; Thursdays 10am - 12 noon
Link to UCLA resources for Student Well-being
Link to UCLA Policy on Academic Integrity

Model the prompt by inputting two or three past syllabi:

Integrate information, readings and topics from this syllabus. Do not include the dates.

NOTE: The example syllabi were freely provided, and previously downloaded from merlot.org

Additional Refining Steps

Provide a list of readings with links; link to a textbook, etc.

Add your lists of readings – Required/Essential, Recommended, etc.

Integrate these readings into the syllabus schedule:

Park, D.C., K. Warner Schaie, K. Schaie, S. L. Willis, S. Willis. Handbook of the Psychology of Aging. 7th edition.

Provide a focused, scripted course description, to narrow and specify content.

Regenerate the syllabus to reflect this description: [your course description goes here]

Read closely and correct!

  • Add your emphases, your voice and values, special sections, and more.
  • Consider sharing your syllabus with a colleague for feedback.

Solicit student feedback

After the quarter is over, ask (some of) your students to give you annotated feedback on your syllabus. Ask them to add comments all over it:

  • what worked well;
  • what advice would they give future students;
  • what would they change;
  • which readings and media made sense;
  • which readings were tough but worthwhile;

and so on…

See also the original session document.

ChatGPT-Generated Quiz Instructions

Advice from ChatGPT on how to best use ChatGPT to create quiz questions

Instructions Generated by AI

Here are some instructions for college instructors to use ChatGPT to author low stakes quizzes. By following these steps, you can use ChatGPT to create low-stakes quizzes that assess your students’ knowledge and understanding of course concepts.

Identify the Topic

Decide on the topic for the quiz. This could be a specific concept or a broad subject area.

Determine the Learning Objectives

Identify the learning objectives you want your students to achieve through the quiz. These objectives should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART).

Choose the Quiz Type

Determine the type of quiz you want to create. This could be a multiple-choice, true/false, or short answer quiz.

Provide ChatGPT with the Question

Use ChatGPT to generate questions related to the learning objectives and the chosen quiz type. You can provide ChatGPT with a prompt, such as “Please generate five multiple-choice questions about the topic of X,” and it will provide you with questions to choose from.

Review and Edit Questions

Review the questions generated by ChatGPT and edit them as needed. Ensure that the questions are clear, concise, and aligned with the learning objectives.

Create Answer Choices

If you’re creating a multiple-choice quiz, provide ChatGPT with answer choices for each question. Ensure that the answer choices are plausible and that one option is clearly the correct answer.

Finalize the Quiz

Once you’ve reviewed and edited the questions and answer choices, finalize the quiz by creating a clear and concise set of instructions for your students, specifying the time limit, grading criteria, and any other relevant information.

Administer the Quiz

Administer the quiz to your students through your preferred learning management system (LMS) or other means of distribution.

Grade the Quiz

Once the quiz is completed, grade the responses according to the grading criteria you established.

Provide Feedback

Provide feedback to your students on their performance on the quiz, including areas where they did well and areas where they could improve.

Suggestions for getting better results when generating quiz questions using ChatGPT

Be Specific with Your Prompts

The more specific your prompts are, the better the results will be. Instead of asking ChatGPT to generate questions about a broad topic, try to provide a specific question or scenario to prompt the AI. This will help ChatGPT understand what type of questions you’re looking for and generate more relevant and focused results.

Provide Additional Context

Providing additional context to ChatGPT can help it generate more relevant and accurate questions. For example, if you’re asking ChatGPT to generate questions about a historical figure, provide some additional context about their life, achievements, and legacy.

Use Proper Grammar and Syntax

ChatGPT works best with clear and grammatically correct input. If you use improper grammar or sentence structure in your prompts, ChatGPT may generate questions that are difficult to understand or nonsensical.

Choose the Right Quiz Type

Different quiz types require different types of prompts. For example, if you’re creating a multiple-choice quiz, provide ChatGPT with answer choices for each question. If you’re creating a short-answer quiz, provide ChatGPT with examples of possible answers to the question.

Review and Edit Generated Questions

ChatGPT is not perfect and may generate questions that are unclear or irrelevant. It’s important to review and edit the generated questions to ensure that they align with your learning objectives and are appropriate for your students.

Using ChatGPT to Write Quiz Questions

Using ChatGPT to Write Quiz Questions

The following are notes from OTL’s session for the AI in Action series.

Mark Kaysar and Agustin Ríos used AI to create quiz questions with different question types. They also prompted ChatGPT to properly format a quiz for uploading into Bruin Learn.

Can ChatGPT help faculty create and format low stakes assessments for using in Canvas?

Demo Question Generation

  • Question Types
  • Multiple Choice
  • True/False
  • Fill in the blank
  • Short Answer
  • Short Essay
  • Adding feedback to answers

Quiz Formatting

When working in ChatGPT, if you include the format instructions shown below you will receive questions that are ready for upload to Canvas. ChatGPT will usually respond in the format you tell it to use, but if it does not, resubmit and ask it to reformat.

Please create all quiz questions using the following format. Each choice needs to start with a lower case alphabet, 
a, b, c, d, etc. with a close parenthesis. The correct choice is designated with an asterisk.

1. What is 2+3?
a) 6
b) 1
*c) 5
d) 10

Sample ChatGPT Prompts

Provide a topic

Can you write some multiple choice questions about [Insert topic]?

Provide a link to a reading

Please write multiple choice questions to evaluate this content.
[paste content]

1.2 The Weakness of Early Patent Systems - Introduction to Intellectual Property | OpenStax

Provide a link to a Canvas page

Please write multiple choice questions to evaluate this content.

Can you provide feedback on why the incorrect items are incorrect?
[paste content]

https://canvas.ucdavis.edu/courses/34528/pages/being-present-in-your-online-course

Provide a desired outcome

Please write multiple choice questions that evaluate this outcome [paste outcome]

Analyze how the costume designer’s interpretation of the screenplay is affected by the 
tone of the politics of the era and the pressures from the studio

Provide a video script or video captions

Please write multiple choice questions to evaluate this content.

[paste content]

Provide a set of answers

Please write multiple choice questions that have the following as answers.

[paste answers]

Provide similar questions to use as a model

Please write multiple choice questions that evaluate the same content as this question.

[paste question]

Uploading to Canvas

Before you can upload the quiz into Canvas, you need to save the questions in the QTI file type.

Step one

Step two

This will create a quiz with your new questions.

See also the original session document.

Using ChatGPT in Conversations with IDs

Using ChatGPT to Lead In-depth Conversations with Instructional Designers

The following are notes from OTL’s session for the AI in Action series.

Sirui Wang and Brittany Goodwell explored possible ways to use ChatGPT to start thinking about different teaching and learning challenges using two scenarios to begin instructional design conversations between faculty and instructional designers. Both scenarios included questions and requests often asked by faculty. There were opportunities to interact with ChatGPT and instructional designers.

How can ChatGPT be involved in the course design process?

  • ChatGPT integrates related information and output in a well-structured way. The advantage of using this generative AI enhances the consultation process with higher efficiency.
  • The conservation style allows the information to be built upon one another, forming a useful dialogue designers can share later.
  • Using ChatGPT in the initiative process of an instructional design consultation helps focus on what faculty needs and narrow the topics, making the discussion with instructional designers more efficient and allowing in-depth discussion.

However, what ChatGPT provides is usually very surface and general, and instructional designers must step in and continue the in-depth conversation.

Instructional Designers’ Roles in the AI Age

  • In-depth conversation
  • Connect with the real course design
  • Ensure equity and inclusion
  • Create personalized learning experiences that adapt to the needs of individual learners
  • Incorporate gamification and simulations to make learning more interactive and engaging
  • Share experience

Scenario 1 – Identify the Teaching and Learning Challenges

ChatGPT Screenshot 1: Engaging students more effectively

How to use ChatGPT to begin the conversation?

  • Start with the basic question/challenge
  • Go through the options, and see if there is anything that interests you
  • Ask for or think of more specific questions, such as #5, why frequent feedback will engage students more efficiently, how to provide frequent feedback, what types of feedback can be provided, etc.

But ChatGPT does not have the accurate context for what it outputs, so a continued conversation with instructional designers are strongly encouraged.

How to continue the topic with an Instructional Designer?

  • Discuss and continue the specific questions: Why feedback loop is important, especially online? What feedback loops can and will include?
  • Clarify the focus: what could be a good fit for your class? How do involve the three parties in a class: instructor, TAs, and students?
  • The deeper conversations: how does it align with other class pieces?
  • Access to other successful course design experiences from different courses

Scenario 2 – Educational Technology Recommendations

Screenshot 2: ChatGPT advice on good class technologies
Screenshot 3: Refining ChatGPT session

How to continue the topic with an Instructional Designer?

  1. Review and refine the recommendations: The faculty member could work with the instructional designer to review the recommendations generated by ChatGPT and refine them based on their specific course needs. The instructional designer could help the faculty member evaluate the options based on factors such as ease of use, accessibility, cost, and pedagogical value.
  2. Identify and address potential challenges: The faculty member and instructional designer could discuss potential challenges that may arise from implementing the selected educational technology in their course. This could include issues related to technology integration, student engagement, and support for students who may have varying levels of technological proficiency.
  3. Explore implementation strategies: The faculty member and instructional designer could work together to explore implementation strategies for the educational technology recommendations.
  4. Determine next steps: The faculty member and instructional designer could determine next steps for moving forward with the implementation of the selected educational technology. This could include identifying any additional support or resources needed, setting timelines for implementation, and designing appropriate activities.

See also the original session document.

AI in Action – Course Design Opportunities with AI

Course Design Opportunities with AI

On May 16, 2023, as part of the campus series, “AI in Action: Exploring AI’s Potential in Teaching and Learning,” OTL instructional designers worked with over 30 participants across three breakout rooms to explore ways that AI can be used to enhance teaching and learning.

  • Using ChatGPT to Lead In-depth Conversations with Instructional Designers: Sirui Wang and Brittany Goodwell explored possible ways to use ChatGPT to start thinking about different teaching and learning challenges using two scenarios to begin instructional design conversations between faculty and instructional designers. Both scenarios included questions and requests often asked by faculty. There were opportunities to interact with ChatGPT and instructional designers.
  • Using ChatGPT to Write Quiz Questions: Mark Kaysar and Agustin Ríos used AI to create quiz questions with different question types. They also prompted ChatGPT to properly format a quiz for uploading into Bruin Learn.
  • Syllabus Refresh Using Prompt Engineering in ChatGPT: Kim DeBacco and Kate Schaller worked with faculty to generate and regenerate a course syllabus. Together they investigated prompt engineering to iteratively refine their choices.

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